Finishing the Summer Trip

Well, we never officially finished the trip log from our adventures over the summer of 2014. We got behind on the blog, and while we had the best intentions to continue once we got home, we got caught up with life and never made the time.

Near Portland, ME.

Near Portland, ME.

We have enjoyed writing about our trip, and hope to write more in the future, but we’ve also realized that keeping a blog really is a full time commitment. It is difficult to find a balance between writing about our adventures, and including practical information for others who would like to visit places we went, so in the near future I hope to put together some pages with more practical information for some destinations.

To briefly cover the remainder of our trip, we spent only a few days on the southern coast of Nova Scotia, using it as stepping stones to get to Maine. An old Dalhousie University classmate of mine, Tyler joined us in  Yarmouth, on the southern tip of Nova Scotia, and sailed with us for a week. We first crossed the Bay of Fundy (125 nmi) and then he travelled with us a little bit around Maine. It was great to have another person to talk to for a while and I think he had a good time sailing with us. As well it was his first overnight passage, making the trip all the more memorable.

Tyler on the Bay of Fundy crossing, it got very cold!

Tyler on the Bay of Fundy crossing, it got very cold!

Getting to Yarmouth from Port La Tour to meet Tyler was some of the hardest sailing we did, and if we were to go from Nova Scotia to Maine again we would not make that extra trip. While we started early in the day to catch the tides (22 feet that day!) and the coinciding currents (up to 5 knots), the opposing wind direction made the trip slow. The result was wind versus tide resulting in very large, confused seas and a terrible, wet day for us. The shinning sun was about the only thing that kept us sane. We then visited the Benjamin River via the Eggemoggin Reach in Maine. From there we spent the next two weeks sailing and exploring Camden, Rockport, Vinyl Haven, North Haven, Isle-au-haut and Hurricane Island.

On Vinyl Haven.

On Vinyl Haven.

We then spent a week in Little River, ME, near Boothbay. Here we met both our parents who had rented a nice house for the week (with a dock we could tie up to!). We explored the area with minimal sailing due to strong winds and big seas. The Booth Bay area is far less protected than the Penobscot Bay area to the north.  It was great to meet up and spend many days in one location, which we had not really done on our trip thus far.

Jess and family sailing in the Damariscotta River.

Jess and family sailing in the Damariscotta River.

Matt and his parents at the Maine Botanical Gardens.

Matt and his parents at the Maine Botanical Gardens.

After leaving the Boothbay we were really on our way home. We visited Sequin Island and had a nice time with friends in York, ME (which has crazy currents, be careful trying to get to that harbor!). We then stopped in Isle of Shoals, Gloucester (via the Annisquam River), Boston Islands and Boston City, Provincetown, Hadley Harbour and finally Vineyard Haven on Monday October 20.

The Sequin Island Light house, a First Order Fresnel lens made up of 282 glass prisms. The light is visible from over twenty nautical miles. The original lighthouse was established here in 1795 and is Maine's tallest and second oldest lighthouse. The Fresnel lens was installed in 1857.

The Sequin Island Light house, a First Order Fresnel lens made up of 282 glass prisms. The light is visible from over twenty nautical miles. The original lighthouse was established here in 1795 and is Maine’s tallest and second oldest lighthouse. The Fresnel lens was installed in 1857.

Overall we had a really nice time sailing around Maine and back down to Martha’s Vineyard, though the wind was generally not from the North as we would have liked. Based on word of mouth, wind roses and various weather books we expected more northerly wind to push us home by late October, but you really never can predict the weather, so best to leave a few extra days to get where you’re going.

Going under the railway bridge near Bourne, MA, in the Cape Cod Canal. Almost home!

Going under the railway bridge near Bourne, MA, in the Cape Cod Canal. Almost home!

Getting home was a great relief, and we’re happy to be on a nice secure mooring behind the breakwater in Vineyard Haven. We’ll see when we get out sailing next but hopefully it will be before the winter.

Andy on Harmony, our welcoming committee in Hadley's Harbor

Andy on Harmony, our welcoming committee in Hadley’s Harbor

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4 comments

  1. Hey guys, just checked out your blog. Its great! Wow, time flys…… What a winter! Were starting to think about taking the cover off Sea Change and getting her ready for water. Hope your both well. Dorian

  2. Just read your last post – last for this voyage – but still more places to visit by water! Enjoyed our time with you both and look forward to sailing more on Heart’s Desire in the future.
    Sue and Jim

  3. Thanks for the journey.

    We really enjoyed meeting you on top of duck Harbor mountain on Isle au Haut. And best of luck to you both

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

    1. Hi there,
      It was a great to meet you guys up there, and really shows how small the world is (especially the old wooden boat world)!
      We hope to get back up to Maine in the next few summers so will perhaps meet again. Let us know if you’re on the Vineyard!
      Cheers! Jess & Matt

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